Airlines of South Australia

IATA Code:  RT

ICAO Code:  LRT

Known As: ASA

Full Name: Airlines of South Australia

Country: Australia

Call sign: ALSA



Objects in Collection







Brief History


On 21 December, 1959, Guinea Airways Limited was officially renamed Airlines of South Australia Pty. Ltd., although it had used that business name internally from 14 December.

On 18 January, 1960, Airlines of South Australia began operations.  Its initial fleet was one Convair CV-440 (VH-BZH), five DC-3s (VH-ANN, VH-ANP, VH-ANS, VH-ANW & VH-INB) & one Auster J/5 (VH-BYU).  Its initial operations were Adelaide-Port Lincoln-Minnipa-Ceduna, Adelaide-Port Pirie-Whyalla, Adelaide Kangaroo Island, Adelaide-Renmark Mildura, Adelaide-Cowell-Cleve-Kimba, Adelaide-Radium Hill-Broken Hill & the Adelaide-Woomera charter operation.  Convair CV-440 VH-BZH began operations with A.S.A. on that date, replacing TAA’s CV-240 VH-TAR.  The CV-440 initially operated to Broken Hill, Port Lincoln, Port Pirie, Whyalla, & Woomera.

With the change to Ansett ownership, the services to Woomera saw G.A.L. DC-3 & TAA DC-4 services replaced by A.S.A. DC-3 & CV-440 services, with a peak of 9 CV-440 & 4 DC-3 services a week Monday-Friday.  Fokker F.27s were operated from February, 1972, although the services were gradually reduced to two per week, as demand reduced.
On 13 March, Convair CV-440 VH-BZN joined VH-BZH.

On 26 April, DC-3 VH-INB was withdrawn from service by A.S.A.; leaving A.S.A. with two 52-seat CV-440s (VH-BZH & VH-BZN) & four 24-seat DC-3s (VH-ANN, VH-ANP, VH-ANS, VH-ANW).

During June, the Convair service to Whyalla became non-stop, with Port Pirie reverting to being served by DC-3s; due to the deterioration of the Port Pirie runway, because of the weight of the Convairs.
During August, Auster J/5 VH-BYU was sold.

On 14 December Convair CV-440 VH-BZN inaugurated A.S.A.'s Adelaide-Kingscote Convair services, after A.S.A. had spent £20,000 to lengthen & seal the ends of the runway at Kingscote.

During 1960, A.S.A. carried 94,614 passengers & 2,254,117 lbs (1,023,393kg) of freight.  It started off-peak weekend package tours to American River, Kangaroo Island, which proved to be very popular.

During September, 1961, A.S.A. announced that charter flights to Proserpine (with an optional fuel stop at Charleville) would commence in October (alternate Sundays).  This provided a direct air link from Adelaide to the Whitsundays.  The charters lasted until August 1965.

During October, DC-3 VH-ABR joined the Airlines of South Australia fleet.  It served until 05 October, 1971.
Later in October, DC-3 VH-ANP was withdrawn from service; reducing the fleet to two 52-seat CV-440s (VH-BZH & VH-BZN) & four 24-seat DC-3s (VH-ABR, VH-ANN, VH-ANS, VH-ANW).

During 1961, A.S.A. carried 132,892 passengers, with a load-factor of 57.9%.

On 14 May, 1962, A.S.A. introduced Convair CV-440 VH-BZF to service, replacing VH-BZH.
On 03 June, A.S.A. ceased operations to Radium Hill, after the rundown of mining there.  Since 01 March 1954, G.A.L./A.S.A. had carried 4,770 passengers & 128,152 lbs. (58,128kg) of freight on these services.
On 01 September, Airlines of South Australia purchased Piaggio P.166B VH-ASA.  It arrived at Adelaide 19 February, 1963, but did not enter scheduled A.S.A. service until 11 December, 1963.

On 13 October, Airlines of South Australia began 3-times-weekly operations from Adelaide to Naracoorte & Millicent; initially using DC-3s; pending the availability of the Piaggio P.166.

The operation was spasmodic, because of the periodic unserviceability of the Naracoorte Airport, due to wet weather.  The service lasted only until 23 August, 1965.

During 1962, A.S.A. carried 130,960 passengers, with a load-factor of 57.6%.

On 11 December, 1963, Piaggio P.166B VH-ASA, which had been used for ad-hoc services since 19 February,  commenced Adelaide-Naracoorte-Millicent-Adelaide services.They were temporarily suspended 20 July, 1964 & recommenced on 14 December, 1964. During 1963, A.S.A. carried 138,709 passengers, with a load-factor of 57.7%.

On 05 February, 1964, Airlines of South Australia replaced DC-3s with their Piaggio P.166B VH-ASA on their Adelaide-Renmark-Mildura route.

From 24 February- 23 March, A.S.A. wet-leased DC-4 VH-INJ, from Airlines of N.S.W., whilst their Convair CV-440s VH-BZF & VH-BZN were being overhauled. This & the March/April 1965 operations were A.S.A.’s only 4-engined operation.
On 20 July, A.S.A.’s, Piaggio P.166B Adelaide-Naracoorte-Millicent-Adelaide services were temporarily suspended & recommenced on 14 December.

During August Port Lincoln was upgraded to have permanent runway lighting; providing increased scheduling flexibility for A.S.A. services. During September Piaggio P.166B VH-ASA began operating the Adelaide-Cowell-Clive-Kimba route.
During November, Piaggio P.166B VH-ASA visited Port Lincoln for the first time, on a charter flight.
On 11 December, Airlines of South Australia Pty Ltd. was renamed Guinea Airways Pty Ltd.

Extracts from an internal ASA document compiled by the Company Secretary, Colin Window, state: ‘Associated with the need to register the business name ‘Airlines of South Australia’ the company ‘Airlines of South Australia Pty Ltd’ was renamed ‘Guinea Airways Pty Ltd’ on 11/12/64.

The latter company was sold as a ‘going concern’ to ‘Australian National Airways Pty Ltd’ at book values as from 14/12/64. ‘Guinea Airways Pty Ltd’ was placed into voluntary liquidation on 19/11/65.
On 11 December, the airline 'Airlines of South Australia Pty Ltd' legally became 'Australian National Airways Pty Ltd’, trading as 'Airlines of South Australia'., via the above procedure.

On 14 December, A.S.A.’s, Piaggio P.166B Adelaide-Naracoorte-Millicent-Adelaide services recommenced; scheduling 4 return flights per week.  They ceased 04 August, 1965. During 1964, A.S.A. carried 158,075 passengers, with a load-factor of 59.1%.                     

From 18 March-14 April, 1965, A.S.A. again wet-leased DC-4 VH-INJ; this time from ANSETT-ANA.
During June, Airlines of South Australia ordered its 1st Fokker F.27 Mk. 200.  VH-FNP was delivered in September 1966.
On 23 July, DC-3 VH-ANN was temporarily transferred to Queensland Airlines.  It returned to A.S.A. service in September.
On 04 August, A.S.A.’s, Piaggio P.166B Adelaide-Naracoorte-Millicent-Adelaide services ceased.
On 23 August, A.S.A. ceased all operations to Naracoorte & Millicent.
During August, A.S.A. ceased operating its Adelaide-Proserpine charter flights.
During 1965, A.S.A. carried 169,728 passengers, with a load-factor of 58.8%.

On 28 January, 1966, DC-3 VH-ANS was withdrawn from service.
On 15 April, DC-3 VH-ANN was withdrawn from service.  It was ferried to Essendon the next day.
On 16 April, DC-3 VH-ANZ entered A.S.A. service; replacing VH-ANN.

On 08 July, Airlines of South Australia withdrew Piaggio P.166B Portofino VH-ASA from service.
On 12 September, Airlines of South Australia introduced its 1st Fokker F.27 Friendship VH-FNP, into service; operating GJ1116/1115 Adelaide-Port Lincoln-Adelaide.  It was replaced by VH-FNI in May 1968.

On 15 September, Airlines of South Australia operated its last Adelaide-Port Pirie-Adelaide services.
From 19 September, A.S.A.’s Adelaide-Cleve-Cowell-Kimba & Adelaide-Minnipa-Ceduna services (via Port Lincoln) were combined into a twice-weekly Adelaide-Cleve-Minnipa-Ceduna DC-3 service & a one-weekly Adelaide-Cowell-Cleve-Kimba DC-3 service.

During 1966 ‘Mystery Flights’ were introduced by A.S.A. - initially $8 for adults & $4 for children.
During 1966, A.S.A. carried 167,421 passengers, with a load-factor of 59.3%.

On 02 August, 1967, Airlines of South Australia ceased Adelaide-Renmark-Mildura operations, as they were no longer viable.
During 1967, A.S.A. carried 174,912 passengers, with a load-factor of 62.9%.

On 02 February, 1968, Airlines of South Australia ceased air services to Cowell, replacing them with a road connection via Cleve.  F.27s replaced DC-3s on a twice-weekly Adelaide-Cleve-Minnipa-Ceduna-Adelaide service.
During May, DC-3 VH-ANZ was withdrawn from A.S.A. service & ferried to Essendon.  That left A.S.A. with just two passenger DC-3s VH-ABR & VH-ANW.

On 10 May, A.S.A. introduced Fokker F.27 VH-FNI, to replace VH-FNP.  It served the airline until 13 August, 1977.
In the 8 years from 30 June, 1960 to 30 June 1968, the company’s passenger figures climbed from 124,567 to 173,593.
On 08 August, the operating name Airlines of South Australia was changed to Ansett Airlines of South Australia.  The new trading name was registered 08 August, but rights to the old
name were retained.

The airline’s Convair CV-440s & DC-3s were not repainted in the new titling & livery, as they were expected to be retired in the then near future. As of 31 August, the Ansett Airlines of. South Australia fleet consisted of two 52-seat CV-440s (VH-BZF & VH-BZN), one 40-seat Fokker F.27 (VH-FNI) & two 24-seat DC-3s
(VH-ABR & VH-ANW). During 1968, Airlines of South Australia/Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 163,796 passengers, with a load-factor of 59.4%.
        
During 1969, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 166,463 passengers, with a load-factor of 60.4%.

During 1970, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 167,903 passengers, with a load-factor of 61.1%.

On 26 February, 1971, Fokker F.27 VH-FNB temporarily joined the Ansett Airlines of South Australia fleet, being returned to Ansett Airlines of Australia on 27 March
(after the loss of VH-FNE on 25 March).  It returned on 31 October.
On 13 March, VH-ABR flew what was planned to be Ansett Airlines of South Australia’s last scheduled DC-3 service, when it flew Adelaide-Kangaroo Island-Adelaide.

However, due to the loss of F.27 VH-FNE in a hangar fire, VH-ANW & VH-ABR were returned to service in early-April, until finally retired on 04 & 05 October, respectively.
That left Ansett Airlines South Australia with a fleet of two F.27s (VH-FNB & VH-FNI), two Convair CV-440s (VH-BZF & VH-BZN) & two DC-3s (VH-ABR & VH-ANW).

On 04 October, DC-3 VH-ANW was withdrawn from service, followed by VH-ABR on 05 October.
On 31 October, Fokker F.27 VH-FNB rejoined the fleet.  It served until 05 July, 1976.  That gave A.S.A. a fleet of two CV-440s (VH-BZF & VH-BZN) & two F.27s (VH-FNB & VH-FNI).

One of the F.27s was used several times per week to operate Ansett’s AN232/AN233 Adelaide-Leigh Creek-Oodnadatta-Alice Springs-Tennant Creek-Katherine-Darwin & return services.

An Ansett F.27 was positioned to Adelaide, as a substitute A.S.A. aircraft during such operations.
During 1971, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 159,766 passengers, with a load-factor of 62.1%.

On 08 February, 1972, Fokker F.27 VH-FNV entered Ansett Airlines of South Australia service & served with the airline until 01 October, 1977.

The arrival of their 3rd F.27 heralded the end of Ansett Airlines of South Australia’s Convair operations.
On 12 February, Convair CV-440 VH-BZF operated the last Convair service for Ansett Airlines of South Australia & the Ansett Group.
Both CV-440s were ferried to Melbourne & sold in 1973.

During 1972, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 156,020 passengers, with a load-factor of 65.7%.
During January, 1973, Ansett Airlines of South Australia ceased operations to Kimba & Cleve.
On 05 February, Ansett Airlines of South Australia resumed operations to Ceduna, via Port Lincoln & ceased operations to Minnipa.
During 1973, Ansett Airlines of South Australia's two Convair CV-440s (VH-BZF & BZN) were sold.
During 1973, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 179,791 passengers, with a load-factor of 70.5%.
During 1974, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 195,663 passengers, with a load-factor of 67.4%.

Early in 1975, Ansett Airlines of South Australia, along with all other major airlines, was grounded, due to a strike over pay claims by air hostesses.

On 15 June, the last Ansett Airlines of South Australia.-operated Ansett Airlines of Australia flights to/from Darwin (normally AN232/AN233) took place.

On 18 June, Ansett Airlines of South Australia replaced Ansett Airlines of Australia on the Adelaide-Mt. Gambier route.
During August, Ansett Airlines of South Australia pilots, along with their fellow pilots in other ATI subsidiaries in N.S.W. & W.A., struck for 6 days over A.T.I. plans for a single pilot seniority list.

During 1975, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 210,157 passengers, with a load-factor of 67.1%.

From 30June, 1976, 44-seat Fokker F.27 VH-FNJ joined the Ansett Airlines of South Australia fleet from Airlines of N.S.W., to replace 40-seat VH-FNB (which departed 5 days later), as part of the Company’s plan to standardise on 44-seat F.27s.  It was returned to Ansett Airlines of Australia 24 July, 1977.

From December, Williams Airlines began competing with Ansett Airlines of South Australia on the Adelaide-Clive-Minnipa-Ceduna route. During 1976, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 214,215 passengers, with a load-factor of 66.6%.

On 23 July, 1977, Fokker F.27 VH-FNP rejoined the Ansett Airlines of South Australia fleet (VH-FNI & VH-FNV), joined the fleet.  It replaced VH-FNJ.On 24 July, Fokker F.27 VH-FNJ returned to Ansett Airlines of Australia.
On 01 August, Fokker F.27 VH-MMV (which had been converted to 44 seats by Ansett Airlines of Australia) joined the fleet.  It remained with A.S.A. until April 1982.
On 13 August, the 40-seat VH-FNI operated its last Ansett Airlines of South Australia service, leaving Fokker F.27s VH-FNP, VH-FNV & VH-MMV; each with 44 seats.On 01 October, VH-FNV operated its last Ansett Airlines of South Australia service.
On 03 December, Fokker F.27 VH-MMR joined the fleet; remaining with A.S.A. until the end of operations.
During 1977, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 218,854 passengers, with a load-factor of 67.5%.

During 1978, Ansett Airlines of South Australia put a lot of effort into promoting holiday charters to such places as Hobart & Launceston, Tasmania, Birdsville, Qld., Alice Springs & area (weekly), Bourke/Lightening Ridge & Canberra/Cooma.
This helped create revenue at a time when the Federal Government’s ‘Open Skies’ policy was allowing more & more commuter airlines to compete directly with A.S.A. 

Most commuter airlines operated 9-seat aircraft, with one pilot & no flight attendant, or in-flight service; meaning that their costs were much lower than Ansett Airlines of South Australia’s.
During 1978, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 228,504 passengers, with a load-factor of 68.2%.

On 27 February, 1979, Ansett Airlines of South Australia began operating charter flights Adelaide-Moomba-Adelaide; carrying workers & equipment, under a 5-year contract with Santos Ltd.
During the peak construction period for Moomba, Ansett Airlines of South Australia was operating up to 3 flights per day, 6 days a week into Moomba.  In 1980 Ansett Airlines of South Australia operated 77 F.27 trips to/from Moomba, carrying 6800 passengers.  In 1983, there were 591 trips, carrying some 52,000 passengers.  By mid-1984 there were some 8 services per week to/from Moomba.  A.S.A. operations to/from Moomba lasted until 29 June, 1985.

From 02 April, Radford-Silver City Airlines began competing with Ansett Airlines of South Australia to/from Broken Hill.
On 20 April, Ansett Airlines of South Australia ceased operating its scheduled charters Adelaide-Woomera-Adelaide.  The last service, on that date, was operated by F.27 VH-MMR.

Woomera had been served by Guinea Airways for some 9 years, followed by 19 years, 3 months & 2 days of service by Ansett Airlines of South Australia.  The effect on Ansett Airlines of South Australia’s bottom-line of loss of these charters was enormous.  They had, in effect, subsidised many of its other operations.  At its peak, up to nine CV-440, & four DC-3 services had operated on the Monday-Friday schedule, reducing, towards the end, to just two F.27 flights per week.

From 21 May, Commodore Airlines began competing with Ansett Airlines of South Australia to/from Port Lincoln.
From 01 August, Williams Airlines began competing with Ansett Airlines of South Australia to/from Kingscote & Whyalla.
On 20 August, Rossair began competing with Ansett Airlines of South Australia Adelaide-Mt. Gambier-Adelaide.
During 1979, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 223,773 passengers, with a load-factor of 66.2%.             

From 09 November, 1980, Ansett Airlines of S.A. entered into a route-sharing agreement with Rossair; with Rossair operating some off-peak services, mainly using 9-seat Cessna types (usually Cessna 402s, or Cessna 404s), with backup of smaller Cessna types (usually 5-seat Cessna 310s, but also a 5-seat Cessna T303).  7-seat Cessna 414s were also used.
From 10 November, Rossair began operating Adelaide-Whyalla-Adelaide & Adelaide-Mt. Gambier-Adelaide off-peak services for Ansett Airlines of South Australia.
During November Ansett Airlines of South Australia won a contract to serve Olympic Dam.  Services were operated for Ansett Airlines of South Australia by Rossair; using Cessna 402s & 404s.  Rossair also operated Adelaide-Roxby Downs & Adelaide-Mt. Gambier on behalf of Ansett Airlines of South Australia & supplemented Ansett Airlines of South Australia services to Port Lincoln, Whyalla & Broken Hill.
During 1980, Ansett Airlines of South Australia carried 213,273 passengers, with a load-factor of 63.8%.

On 23 April, 1981, a national strike of flight attendants for all Australian airlines began, over pay & other conditions.  Ansett Airlines of South Australia services restarted 27 April.
On 04 May, Rossair began operating Ansett Airlines of South Australia services to/from Ceduna & Port Lincoln.
On 15 July, Ansett Airlines of South Australia was renamed Airlines of South Australia.  The S.A. Premier, David Tonkin, presided over the unveiling of the new name & color-scheme at Adelaide Airport on that date.  A new timetable in the new logo commenced the same date.
Promotion for the new name commenced on 27/06/81, with filming of a commercial, with F.27 VH-MMR in the new color-scheme.

The new ‘Piping Shrike’ livery was progressively introduced to its F.27s.  F.27 VH-MMR was unveiled in the new livery on 11 July.  VH-MMV followed on 06 October & VH-FNP on
19 February, 1982. During 1981, Ansett Airlines of South Australia/Airlines of South Australia carried 197,169 passengers, with a load-factor of 63.8%.

On 14 March, 1982, Airlines of South Australia’s three F.27s, in their new ‘Piping Shrike’ livery, were official named at a ceremony held at West Beach on 14 March, 1982.  They were named after famous South Australians - VH-FNP n was named 'Sir Thomas Playford', but carried the name 'Tom Playford', VH-MMR was named 'Sir Hans Heysen', but carried the name 'Hans Heysen' & VH-MMV was named 'Sir Douglas Mawson', but carried the name 'Douglas Mawson'.
On 15 March, Rossair began operating services for A.S.A. from Adelaide to Streaky Bay & Ceduna.
During May, ‘Mystery Flights’ were reintroduced.

On 26 June, Fokker F.27 VH-FNR was leased to Airlines of South Australia; in part to operate 4-times-per-week freight flights between Adelaide & Melbourne.  It was delivered on 10 August, entered service on 13 August.  Being a ‘QC’, it was leased by Ansett Air Freight for night freight services, mainly Adelaide-Melbourne-Adelaide.
During August, Rossair began operating some Airlines of South Australia services to/from Kingscote.
F.27 VH-FNR was named 'Daisy Bates' on 13 September.

During 1982, Airlines of South Australia carried 193,337 passengers, with a load-factor of 64.7%.

During 1983, Airlines of South Australia carried 190,100 passengers, with a load-factor of 66.0%.    

During December, 1984, Rossair began operating at least some Airlines of South Australia services from Adelaide to/from Port Lincoln & Broken Hill. During December, Ansett Airlines of South Australia F.27 VH-FNP operated a charter to/from Maralinga; the only F.27 ever to do so.  During 1984, Airlines of South Australia carried 193,337 passengers, with a load-factor of 59.4%.

In April, 1985, Airlines of South Australia advised its staff that its bid to extend the Santos contract for another 5 years had not been successful (it going to Lloyd Aviation, using an F28 Mk. 1000 - VH-LAR).  The last Airlines of South Australia charter service was on 29 June.  This was a major blow to Airlines of South Australia, as the contract was a major part of Ansett Airlines of South Australia’s revenue.
On 29 June, Airlines of South Australia operated its last charter flight Adelaide-Moomba-Adelaide.  Scheduled services continued until 10 April, 1986.

From 31 July-30 October, Airlines of South Australia operated Adelaide-Uluru (Ayers Rock) services, in an attempt to utilise its F.27s.  The service was terminated due to poor loadings.

Efforts were made by Airlines of South Australia to obtain a state subsidy, to help F.27 operations continue; to no avail.
On 18 September, Fokker F.27 VH-MMV was returned to Ansett.
On 19 September, Fokker F.27 VH-FNU entered Airlines of South Australia service, in Air Queensland colors; temporarily replacing VH-MMV.  It with withdrawn from service 08 November.

From 15 October, ‘Scenic Flights’ from Port Lincoln to Ceduna were offered on Mondays & Thursdays, at a cost of $15 for adults & $10 for children.

On 09 November, Fokker F.27 VH-MMV returned to Airlines of South Australia service, replacing VH-FNU.
On 15 November, Airlines of South Australia operated its last Adelaide-Mt. Gambier-Adelaide services.  The last services (GJ494/495) were operated by F.27 VH-FNR.
On 17 November, Kendell Airlines took over Airlines of South Australia’s Adelaide-Mt. Gambier services.
On 02 December, Fokker F.27 VH-FNR was withdrawn from service by Airlines of South Australia & their involvement in Adelaide-Melbourne freight services ceased.  It ferried to Melbourne the next day.
During 1985, Airlines of South Australia carried 175,410 passengers, with a load-factor of 63.3%

On 19 February, 1986, it was officially announced that Airlines of South Australia would cease all operations on 27 June, because of continuing losses, due to increased competition & the loss of the services to/from Woomera & Moomba, which helped greatly to underwrite many other services.  A 06 March attempt to persuade Sir Peter Abeles to reverse the decision failed.

On 06 March, F.27 VH-MMR operated Airlines of South Australia's last service to/from Ceduna, when it operated GJ446/447 Adelaide-Port Lincoln-Ceduna-Port Lincoln-Adelaide.
Kendell took over the route.

On 07 March, Rossair operated the last A.S.A. service to/from Streaky Bay & Ceduna.  Kendell took over the route.
On 09 March, F.27 VH-FNP operated Airlines of South Australia's last Adelaide-Broken Hill-Adelaide services, as GJ464/465.  Lloyd Airlines (S.A.) began their service the next day.

From 10 March, Kendell Airlines began to progressively take over many services operated by Airlines of South Australia, starting with Adelaide Broken Hill, Ceduna & Streaky Bay.

On 04 April, F.27 VH-MMR operated Airlines of South Australia's last Adelaide-Kingscote (Kangaroo Island)-Adelaide services, when it operated GJ478/479.  This was the last of some 20,000 A.S.A. flights; carrying some 1.5 million passengers.
On 10 April, F.27 VH-MMV operated Airlines of South Australia's last service to/from Moomba.  VH-MMV was ferried to Melbourne the next day.
         
On 27 June, 1986, Airlines of South Australia ceased operations.
The last services were GJ456/457 Adelaide-Whyalla-Adelaide, operated by F.27 VH-MMR & GJ440/441 Adelaide-Port Lincoln-Adelaide, operated by F.27 VH-FNP.

By 21.00L, 27 June, Airlines of South Australia had operated its last flight.

Most remaining routes were progressively taken over by Kendell Airlines (Mt. Gambier had been taken over the previous November & Port Lincoln & Whyalla on 28 June). During 01 January-27 June, 1986, Airlines of South Australia carried 54,686 passengers, with a load-factor of 74.00%.

General Manager, L. ‘Mick’ Connelly summed it up well, when he stated “We close because you cannot maintain a finely-tuned business like ours, and maintain the standard we were providing, in an era of deregulation.  It is a fact that Airlines of S.A. country services were maintained by our charters. It required fine attention to cost structure in a state where we had shrinking country markets.  During its twenty-six years of operations, Airlines of S.A. carried between four & five million passengers, and boasted a perfect safety record.”

On 28 June, A.S.A.’s last aircraft, F.27s VH-FNP & VH-MMR were ferried to Melbourne, as GJ9000 & GJ9002, respectively.

Airlines of South Australia served the following destinations, at some stage:
Adelaide, Broken Hill, Ceduna, Cleve, Cowell, Kimba, Kingscote/Kangaroo Island, Mildura, Millicent, Minnipa, Moomba, Mt. Gambier, Naracoorte, Olympic Dam, Port Lincoln, Port Pirie, Radium Hill, Renmark, Streaky Bay, Whyalla, Woomera & Yulara.  Berri was served as a road connection to/from Renmark.

Holiday charters were also operated to such places as Proserpine, Hobart & Launceston, Tasmania, Birdsville, Alice Springs & area, Bourke/Lightening Ridge, Canberra/Cooma & Falls Ck./Mt Hotham & freighter operations served Adelaide & Melbourne (Tullamarine)

Fleet:

ATL-98 - Carvair At one stage, Airlines of South Australia was considering operating ATL98 Carvair freight services.  However, the plan did not proceed.

ATR-42 - A.T.I. briefly considered the purchase of ATR-42s for Airlines of. South Australia, in 1983.   No order was placed.

Auster J/5 - VH-BYU.

Cessna T303 - VH-MRO of Rossair.

Cessna 310R - VH-ALY & LAF of Rossair.

Cessna 402 - VH-LAE, LBB, MJI, RGK, RMI(2), RMQ(2), ROS, RUY, TLQ of Rossair.

Cessna 404 - VH-LAD of Rossair.

Cessna 414A - VH-LAG of Rossair.

Cessna 441 -  VH-LBA & LBC of Rossair.

Convair CV-440 - VH-BZF, BZH, BZN.

Douglas DC-3 - VH-ABR, ANN, ANP, ANS, ANW, ANZ, GAH, GAI, GAJ, GAK, GAL, INB.

Douglas DC-4 - VH-INJ.

Fokker F.27 Friendship - VH-FNB, FNI, FNJ, (FNO) (never op), FNP, FNR, FNU, FNV, FNW, MMR, MMV. 

One source suggests that the following F.27s flew ad-hoc services for A.S.A., during the periods noted : VH-FNE? (12/66? & 12/68?), VH-FNK (04/68, 07/68 & 11/68), VH-FNL (03/68 & 07/68), VH-FNM (11/66 & 02/68), VH-FNN (02/68), VH-FNS (03/67), VH-FNT (07/69), VH-MMO (10/70 & 08/71), VH-MMS (01/72).  It should be noted that A.S.A. F.27s often operated Ansett's 'milk run' F.27 flights Adelaide-Darwin & were replaced by Melbourne-based Ansett F.27s on an 'ad-hoc' basis.  So this list does not claim to be complete.

Fokker 50 - A.T.I.’s order for Fokker 50s, announced 13/02/85, included aircraft for A.S.A.  No F50 served with A.S.A.
Piaggio P.166B Portofino - VH-ASA.


Information Source: Fred Niven


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